TOP 10 REASONS Why Scientists Should Join this Forum and Use this Platform (BuzzFeed-style) by Michael Quirke

September 13, 2013 5:47 am0 comments

#1 Individual blog pages for columnists

#1 Individual blog pages for columnists
A columnist’s individual blog page features all of the columnist’s posts and can act as the columnist’s own personal blog. We’ve already done all the hard work.

#2 Separate comment threads for the science columnists and the general public

#2 Separate comment threads for the science columnists and the general public

Anyone who has ever participated in or read the comment thread of any article on climate science will appreciate this. Only science columnists are able to comment in the WordPress theme’s comment thread under a science post. The general public can comment in the separate Facebook comment thread at the very bottom. This small bifurcation is actually a very BIG deal. CCNF is providing the public with a window into a live dialogue on climate change among scientists. Often, the educational value of a post’s comment thread will far surpass that of the actual post. When phase II kicks in, there will be a general division between science and policy. Policy columnists will not be able to to post in science categories or comment under science posts (except in the general public comment thread). However, science columnists will be able to comment under policy posts. Hopefully this will keep the policy discussion and debate grounded in the latest science!

#3 HuffingtonPost-style vertical “sharebar” on every post

#3 HuffingtonPost-style vertical "sharebar" for sharing in social media.

Check out our premiere vertical “sharebar” next to Dr. Nielsen-Gammon’s post (also on this page). The sharebar scrolls down as one reads the post. It is a cutting edge plug-in and enables extensive sharing of content on social media. By the way, Dr. Nielsen-Gammon’s letter is definitely worth reading (click on the screenshot).

#4 WordPress is as easy as it gets

#4 WordPress is as user-friendly as it getsThis is a screen shot of the site’s content management system (aka the “back-end” of the site). It’s super user-friendly, and there’s no coding or html knowledge required. The CCNFR team will set you up and be available to help you out.

#5 Google Authorship = Dominate the online space with your content

#5 Google Authorship = Dominate the online spaceI cannot over emphasize the power of Google Authorship. One of CCNF’s goals is to the dominate the online space with credible content on climate change, so I highly encourage all columnists to set up a Google+ page and link the ClimateChangeNationalForum.org domain to their Google+ profile. This activates Google Authorship. It is well worth 10 minutes of a science columnist’s time.

#6 Growing media library of amazing photos like this to run with content

"Mediterranean Sea and Nile area" with atmosphere visible. NASA ISS via Flickr.

“Mediterranean Sea and Nile area” with atmosphere visible. NASA ISS via Flickr.

As a nonprofit publisher, CCNFR gets to use Flickr Creative Commons photos with our content. This includes the panoply of awesome NASA pics. Columnists can choose from existing photos in the library or upload their own photos. Science columnists just need to remember to accredit the photos that have “Flickr” in their title.

#7 Blog alongside eminent scientists at the forefront of climate science, join in on discussions in the columnist-only comment threads

#7 Blog alongside eminent scientists at the forefront of climate science, join in on discussions in the columnist-only comment threads.This platform rocks, but the real value and potential of this Forum”is our growing community of columnists at the forefront of the science on climate change.

#8 We have a crack team at CCNFR

Michael Quirke, CCNF Executive Director in Baghdad, Iraq (Mar. 2007). He is pretty serious when he takes on a mission.

Michael Quirke in Baghdad, Iraq during “The Surge.”  Aug. 7, 2007.

I am a man on a mission, and my mission is to crowdsource scientists at the forefront of the published scientific literature on climate change on the platform and have them share their scientific judgments with each other and the American people and identify the misinformation and disinformation in the media. And hire on a journalist to make it as accessible as possible to the people. As Einstein said it best, “make things as simple as possible but not simplier.”  It’s only a matter of critical mass. We achieve that, and CCNF will dominate the Google search results pages (“SERPs “) of climate change-related keyword searches.

#9 Set the scientific foundation for an ongoing policy debate in phase II

#9 Set the scientific foundation for an ongoing policy debate in phase II.To use this platform in phase II, subject matter experts and policy makers must propose and debate a policy position “based on the science discussed or reviewed by the science columnists” (see CCNFR bylaws). We are going to bridge science with policy, but we will only be successful if enough scientists participate.

#10 There’s nothing else like this on the web.

#10 There's nothing else like this on the web.
Be a part of a community of scientists that will bridge the gap between science and policy. All it takes is communicating your scientific judgments to the public and to each other. You will be educating the public not only on the science of climate change but also on how science works in general. Most importantly, you’re collective blogging will be setting the foundation for an ongoing policy debate by policy makers on either side of the aisle. CCNFR is a crowdsourcer. We only ask a little from a lot from the scientific community.

JOIN CLIMATE CHANGE NATIONAL FORUM! 

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