• Now 17 months in, the Forum has garnered the volunteer participation of dozens of scientists at the forefront of climate change research and science communication. Through the open inquiry, true scientific skepticism, and generous participation of this ever-growing community, a set of consensuses (with their multiple lines of evidence) has clearly emerged, and a common, accurate understanding of the science (and its wider implications) has been borne out. Most impressively, CCNF has garnered an audience that spans scientific and political spectra. Just check out who’s following us on Twitter.
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The Forum comprises three main dialogues focusing on the science of climate change, values, and climate change policy. The last includes subjects like economics, geopolitics, energy, and innovation. With funding, CCNF journalists will cover and moderate this ongoing dialogue, as well as cover key developments on this issue. See specific dialogues.
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In the fact checker, journalists procure outside material for the scientists to fact check or comment on. The material is circulated among the scientists internally for the collection of initial comments before publishing. There’s nothing like it on the internet. With sponsorship and partnership with strong institutions, CCNF will be able to leverage the compensated participation of a vast community of active climate scientists, keep up with the press, and serve as a powerful accountability mechanism in the online space. Check it out.
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CCNF is first-and-foremost a journalistic initiative. The Forum is designed to be run, covered, and moderated by a small team of staff journalists. With funding, this crack team will also go out on assignments, investigate issues, and publish material in the Journalists’ Section. We also want to dispatch journalists to confront the presidential candidates on the science and elicit an answer on what can or should be done as a nation. See more.
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Check out the latest coverage of major developments in the climate space by the journalists on staff and in our community. With partnership and funding, CCNF will establish a new brand and new standard of journalism on climate change.
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Check out CCNF’s ever-growing community of contributors, which includes scientists at the forefront of climate change research and communication, all kinds of subject matter experts, faith leaders, unique voices, and influential policy experts on both sides of the aisle. This all-volunteer community has set a high standard and represents the power and potential of the CCNF project.
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Join the community and participate in this new national dialogue on climate change! Check out the different categories of contributors and their respective criteria. Applying takes just a few minutes.
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We are looking to team up with at least four university programs and one scientific institution with a strong #SciComm arm. The scientists, professors, and students of these institutions will drive the dialogue in particular areas and be compensated for their contributions. Our partners will collectively underwrite the partnership's costs, though whether or not the partners contribute financially will depend on corporate sponsorship.

 

See PROSPECTUS.
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Our primary media partner will likely be a journalism school, but we are open to collaboration with different news organizations, both large and small. We have a lot to offer them and they have a lot to offer us. Together, we can do more.

 

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In addition to advertising space, this is where our sponsors will be listed. We’re looking for five entities that want to make a real impact. The sponsors will be thanked in all material CCNF produces. They will be recognized in drop-down, video, side-bar, and other prominent ad-space. Their funding will sustain the journalism shop, enable CCNF to run premiere supplemental content, and provide compensation for a regular stream of contributions from our partners' contributors.

 

See PROSPECTUS.
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To become an academic partner, an organization must first contract to underwrite 1/5th of the annual journalism budget and provide regular contributions to the dialogue. Compensation for the content provided by the contributors of a partner will be provided by that partner directly or by a grant through CCNF via funds from the partner's corporate sponsor.

 

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To become a corporate sponsor, a corporation or foundation must fund 1/5th of the annual budget for the journalism shop and the running of premiere outside content and provide funds to compensate the annual contribution of a partner. Our sponsors will be thanked in all material produced by CCNF.

 

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“A free press, doesn’t operate for free at all. Fearless journalism requires a steady stream of independent income.” -Bill Moyers, May 26, 2014. This problem won’t fix itself. Be the change you seek, donate today!
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CCNF is a subscriber to the Socratic Method; in that nothing is assumed and everything has to be “proved up” in the Forum. This keeps everyone on the same page, especially when it comes to the science. Only the science contributors can opine on the science, and only the science and science communication contributors can publish in the science sections. Everyone can speak on values and general policy in the Forum, but the non-scientists have to take the science as it comes.
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Mr. Bob Inglis: Member of U.S. House of Representatives (R-SC4 1993-1999; 2005-2011) and Executive Director of the Energy & Enterprise Initiative
Mr. Bob Inglis
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Dr. Shi-Ling Hsu: Larson Professor of Law at Florida State University School of Law, economist, and author of The Case for the Carbon Tax.
Dr. Shi-Ling Hsu
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Prof. Jed Anderson: Adjunct Professor of Environmental Law at the University of Houston Law Center, Clean Air Act attorney and reform advocate.
Prof. Jed Anderson
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Prof. Tracy Hester: Law faculty and former Director of the Energy, Environment and Natural Resources Center at the University of Houston Law Center.
Prof. Tracy Hester
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Mr. David Hone: Chief Climate Change Adviser for Royal Dutch Shell, board member of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, and author of Putting the Genie Back: 2°C will be harder than we think.
Mr. David Hone
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Dr. Eric Steig: Professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington with a research focus on the development of ice core records and instrumentation methods in isotope geochemistry, co-founder of RealClimate.org.
Dr. Eric Steig
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Dr. Ronald Sass: Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess Professor of Natural Science Emeritus and current Fellow in Climate Science Policy at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University.
Dr. Ronald Sass
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Dr. Muge Komurcu: Research Scientist at the University of New Hampshire, currently working on an interdisciplinary project simulating regional climate change and its influences on ecosystems, ecosystem services, and the economy.
Dr. Muge Komurcu
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Dr. Eric Galbraith: Oceanographer and earth scientist, Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at McGill University.
Dr. Eric Galbraith
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Dr. Will Howard: University of Melbourne School of Earth Sciences and Deputy Chair of the Australian National Committee for Antarctic Research.
Dr. Will Howard
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Dr. Sean Bryan: Paleoclimatolgist and paleoceanographer, Instructor in the Department of Geosciences at Colorado State University.
Dr. Sean Bryan
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Dr. Daniel Cohan: Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, member of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team, and Faculty Scholar at the Baker Institute for Public Policy
Dr. Daniel Cohan
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Dr. Judith Curry: Texas State Climatologist and Regents Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University.
Dr. Judith Curry
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Dr. Sean Robinson: Lecturer in the Dept. of Physics at MIT and leader of the MIT Physics Junior Lab, committee member and secretary of the Coastal Adaptation Advisory Committee for the Town of Marshfield, MA.
Dr. Sean Robinson
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Dr. Stephanie Germaine Thomas: Former development geologist and stratigrapher in the energy industry with research experience in reconstructing ancient environment and climate, current environmental and community advocate.
Dr. Stephanie Germaine Thomas
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Dr. Michael Tobis: Former engineer, climate modeler, and Research Scientist Associate at the University of Texas, and co-founder of Planet3.org
Dr. Michael Tobis
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Dr. Jeremy Shakun: Paleoclimatologist and Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Boston College.
Dr. Jeremy Shakun
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Dr. Scott Denning: Monfort Professor of Atmospheric Science and Director of Education and Diversity for the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes at Colorado State University.
Dr. Scott Denning
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Dr. Andreas Schmittner: Associate Professor of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University.
Dr. Andreas Schmittner
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Dr. Andrew Dessler: Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University, co-author of The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change ('06, '10), and author of Introduction to Modern Climate Change ('11).
Dr. Andrew Dessler
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Dr. Bart Verheggen: Atmospheric scientist, lecturer at Amsterdam University College, and founder of the blog Our Changing Climate.
Dr. Bart Verheggen
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Ms. Lulu Liu: PhD Candidate in Applied Physics at Harvard University and writer on science breakthroughs and science communication.
Ms. Lulu Liu
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Dr. Mauri Pelto: Glaciologist, Director of the North Cascade Glacier Climate Project, and Professor of Environmental Science at Nichols College.
Dr. Mauri Pelto
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Dr. Jim Bouldin: Research ecologist, founder of the blog Ecologically Oriented, and contributor to RealClimate.org.
Dr. Jim Bouldin
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Dr. Barry Lefer: Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry and Associate Chair of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Houston.
Dr. Barry Lefer
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Dr. John Anderson: W. Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography and Director of the Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice University.
Dr. John Anderson
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Dr. Kerry Emanuel: Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Dr. Kerry Emanuel
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Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon: Texas State Climatologist and Regents Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University
Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon
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Any climate or physical scientist that can meet our science contributor criteria is welcome to contribute to the science dialogue. Contributions from science communicators and STEM educators are also welcome. See the latest.
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In the fact checker, journalists procure outside material for the scientists to fact check or comment on. The material is circulated among the scientists internally for the collection of initial comments before publishing. There’s nothing like it on the internet. Check it out.
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How big of a deal is climate change? Why should we care? What does “catastrophic” or “dangerous” climate change mean? These are all values questions, because their answers depend on what we care about. These are questions for all of us. See the latest.
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What can or should be done about climate change as a nation? This is the policy debate. Any policy position will be heard, so long as it is based on the climate science discussed or reviewed by the climate scientists in the Forum. See the latest.
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Technically, this is part of the policy dialogue, but this material gets into the nuts and bolts of economics and geopolitics. See the latest. Most if not all of this material is from our community subject matter experts. See specific topics.
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The issue of climate change is about energy more than anything else. Most if not all of this material is from our community subject matter experts, which includes industry leaders, historians, journalists, and innovators. See the latest by energy topic.
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Click hereto see the specific topics for each dialogue.
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Click here to see the latest coverage of the dialogue in the Forum and for recent interviews and conversations with members in the CCNF community.
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Click here for the most recent stories on major developments in the climate space. Until we get corporate sponsorship, we’ll do our best to not miss “the need to know” stuff.
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See the latest from our journalism staff.
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See the latest from the journalists in the CCNF community.
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These are quarterly reports on all that the CCNF journalists have learned in the dialogue. It’s also a user-friendly “highlight reel” of who said what in the Forum and why it matters. Check it out.
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Check out our community of contributing journalists
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Join the journalism community and contribute to the Forum. The community is but a sum of its parts.
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We hope to field a team of journalism fellows in the near future to augment the operation. This fellowship program will be set up by our academic-media partner.
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We hope to infuse student voices in the coverage of the dialogue and have them apprentice under our journalists and journalism fellows. Nearly every school has a paper, but few can say they are at the forefront of the coverage on an issue, much less one as big and important as climate change
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Our primary media partner will likely be the journalism school of one of our five academic partners. We are also open to collaboration with different news organizations, both large and small. We have a lot to offer them and they have a lot to offer us. Together, we can do more.
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Together, we can do more. Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org.
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Our method is the Socratic method—in that nothing is assumed and everything has to be “proved up” in the Forum. This keeps everyone on the same page, especially when it comes to the science. There’s also a strict bifurcation between science and policy in the Forum.
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CCNF is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit confirmed by the IRS. We were founded in 2012 and are based out of Houston, Texas. Our members are the contributors to our website. Those members that contribute regularly elect the board in annual elections
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The mission of CCNF is to inform and educate the American public on the science of climate change and its policy implications.
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Only the scientists and science communicators admitted by the Science Contributor Committee can contribute to the science dialogue. Any contributor can contribute to the values and policy dialogues and comment in the Forum Comment Thread.
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Check out our ever-growing community of contributors. These contributors comprise the membership of the nonprofit. Members have direct publishing privileges on the platform.
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The columnists are those members that contribute regularly to the Forum. Columnists have voting privileges in the nonprofit. They can also nominate members to run in the board election.
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This group of contributors includes non-members and guests. Unlike the members, these contributors do not have to join CCNF to publish in the Forum, but their content must be approved by the senior journalist before publishing.
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We expect our academic partners to establish a fellowship program in their respective departments and for the fellows to contribute to the dialogue. The fellows will be compensated by an academic partner directly or by a grant to the partner from CCNF via a corporate sponsor
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We expect our academic partners to also establish a student fellowship program to ensure that student voices are heard in the Forum. The student fellows will be compensated by an academic partner directly or by a grant to the partner from CCNF via a corporate sponsor.
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We’re looking for an earth and atmospheric sciences department, a scientific institution with a large outreach network, a humanities program, and an energy and sustainability program to really drive the dialogue, and a journalism school to augment the operation
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Together, we can do more.Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org.
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The columnists are those members that contribute regularly to the Forum. Columnists have voting privileges in the nonprofit. They can also nominate members to run in the board election.
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Together, we can do more.Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org.
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Together, we can do more. Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org.
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A free press, doesn’t operate for free at all. Fearless journalism requires a steady stream of independent income.”-Bill Moyers, 5/26/2015 Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org.
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The difference between a corporate sponsor and a corporate partner is that CCNF will officially endorse the latter. An example would be a video-conferencing software company or some other product that helps us in our educational mission.
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Only in a few limited circumstances could CCNF partner with a private corporation and maintain our journalistic independence and integrity. Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org for more details.
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Check out our executive team.
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Our New Media Journalism Fellow(s) will help the executive team further innovate and improve the CCNF platform. This proposed fellowship program could be set up by one of our academic partners or by an independent source.
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Right now, there’s just a staff of one (acting) journalist. We hope that will change.
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We hope to field a team of journalism fellows in the near future to augment the operation. This fellowship program will be set up by our academic-media partner.
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We hope to infuse student voices in the coverage of the dialogue and have them apprentice under our journalists and journalism fellows. Nearly every school has a paper, but few can say they are at the forefront of the coverage on an issue, much less one as big and important as climate change
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Interested in interning at CCNF? Our last intern had an incredible experience. Our interns can learn and work with us in Houston or operate remotely. Contact m.quirke(at) climatechangenationalforum.org if interested.